So pretty!

Dracula robledorum. Primary hybrid orchid

The orchid genus Dracula, abbreviated as Drac in horticultural trade, consists of 118 species. The strange name Dracula,
literally means “little dragon”, referring to the strange aspect of the two long spurs of the sepals.They were once included in the genus Masdevallia, but became a separate genus in 1978. This genus has some of the more bizarre and well-known species of the subtribe Pleurothallidinae.

Remarkable!

Glowing Cockroach Mimics Toxic Beetle. The cockroach species Luchihormetica luckae emits a green glow. A glowing green cockroach would seem much easier to kill than our more familiar kitchen pests, but this particular insect evolved its own set of lights to avoid exactly such predatory attention, according to a new study.

Luchihormetica luckae glows to mimic the bioluminescent click beetle, whose glow warns predators of its toxicity.Found in rain forests around an active volcano in Ecuador, the inch-long (2.5-centimeter-long) cockroach is unique for a few reasons, scientists say. For one thing, while many life-forms have evolved their own flashiness, most are found in the deep-sea—making bioluminescence a relatively rare trait on land. But L. luckae is particularly rare, in that it glows to mimic another insect. Other uses of bioluminescence in the insect world, as in the case of the common firefly, are more attuned to attracting mates—lighting up to find love in the dark simply saves time. Unfortunately, it also makes one much more visible to predators. “Bioluminescence is like any evolutionary tool—there is no single use for it. It can attract, deter, or even be used as an invisibility cloak of sorts,” said Olivia Judson, an evolutionary biologist and author of Dr. Tatiana’s Sex Advice to All Creation.

Too cute! <3

Golden snub-nosed monkeys.

Snub-nosed monkeys live in Asia, with a range covering southern China (especially Tibet, Sichuan, Yunnan, and Guizhou) as well as the northern part of Vietnam